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Tips of the Week for September, 2014

Flu shots and flu mist available on a limited basis
09-29-2014

We are now offering the following flu vaccines in our four offices.

For all privately insured patients, we have both the flu injectable and the flu mist.

For all Medicaid patients, we have only the flu mist. The state of North Carolina currently has a delay in shipping state flu injectable/ They cannot tell us how long the delay will be but we will update this page as soon as it is available.

Any healthy child over the age of 2 can receive the flu mist. Children under the age of 2, children who are sick, or children with Asthma may have to receive the injectable vaccine.

Our hours for our walk-in flu clinics are from 9:00 to 12:00 in the morning and from 2:00 to 4:00 in the afternoon in all locations. You do not need an appointment during these hours, but please be patient. Demand may be heavy depending upon the day, so there may be a wait. We do not have walk-in hours for flu shots before 9:00, after 4:00 or on weekends.

Please note, due to confidentiality issues, we cannot respond to medical questions sent via Facebook. If you have any questions, please feel free to give us a call at any of our office and we will be glad to help you. We will continue to post updates as we have them on this page.

Getting Your Family Prepared for a Disaster
09-29-2014


What to Tell Your Children about Disasters

It is important to warn children, without overly alarming them, about disasters. Tell children that a disaster is something that could hurt people or cause damage. Explain that nature sometimes provides “too much of a good thing” – fire, rain, or wind. Talk about things that could happen during a storm, like the fact that the lights or phone might not work. Tell children there are many people who can help them during a disaster, so that they will not be afraid of firemen, policemen, paramedics, or other emergency officials.  

Teach children:

  • How to call for help.
  • When to use emergency numbers​.
  • To call the family contact if they are separated.

Staying Calm in an Emergency

The most important role a parent can play in an emergency situation is to stay calm. Children of all ages can easily pick up on their parents’ fears and anxieties. In a disaster, they’ll look to you for help and for clues on how to act. If you react with alarm, a child may become more scared. If you seem overcome with a sense of loss, a child may feel their losses more strongly. Experts agree that you should be honest with your children and explain what’s going on. Just be sure to base the amount of information and level of detail on what’s appropriate for their age level.

Children and Their Response to Disaster

Children depend on daily routines: They wake up, eat breakfast, go to school, and play with friends. When emergencies or disasters interrupt this routine, children may become anxious; not want parents out of their sight/refuse to go to school or child care; or feel guilty that they caused the disaster by something they said or did. Children’s fears also may stem from their imagination, and you should take these feelings seriously. Your words and actions can provide reassurance. When talking with your child, be sure to present a realistic picture that is both honest and manageable. 

Be aware that after a disaster, children are most afraid that:

  • The event will happen again.
  • Someone will be injured or killed
  • They will be separated from the family
  • They will be left alone

Common Child Behaviors after a Disaster

Children may be upset over the loss of a favorite toy, blanket, teddy bear or other items; undergo a personality change–from being quiet, obedient andcaring to loud, noisy and aggressive or from outgoing to shy and afraid; have nightmares or be afraid to sleep alone or with the light off; become easily upset, cry or whine; lose trust in adults because the adults in their life were unable to control the disaster; or revert to younger behavior such as bedwetting and thumb sucking.

Special Needs of Children after a Disaster

Parents should remember that the psychological effects of a natural disaster don’t go away once the emergency has passed. Children can suffer from nightmares or other problems for years after a disaster. Children are better able to cope with a traumatic event if parents, teachers and other adults support and help them with their experiences.

Help should start as soon as possible after the event. Some children may never show distress because they don’t feel upset, while others may not give evidence of being upset for several weeks or even months. Even if children do not show a change in behavior, they may still need your help. Parents should be on the lookout for signs that their kids need some extra counseling​.

What Parents Can Do to Help Children Cope after a Disaster

Talk with children about how they are feeling and listen without judgment. Let them know they can have their own feelings, which might be different than others. Let children take their time to figure things out and to have their feelings. Don’t rush them or pretend that they don’t think or feel as they do. 

Here are some suggested ways to reduce your child’s fear and anxiety:

  • Keep the family together as much as possible. While you look for housing and assistance, try to keep the family together and make children a part of what you are doing. Otherwise, children could get anxious and worry that their parents won’t return.
  • Calmly and firmly explain the situation. As best as you can, tell children what you know about the disaster. Explain what will happen next. For example, say, “Tonight, we will all stay together in the shelter.” Get down to the child’s eye level and talk to them.
  • Encourage children to talk. Let them talk about the disaster and ask questions as much as they want. Encourage children to describe what they’re feeling. Help them learn to use words that express their feelings, such as happy, sad, angry, mad and scared. Just be sure the words fit their feelings–not yours.
  • Listen to what they say. If possible, include the entire family in the discussion. Reassure them that the disaster was not their fault in any way. Assure fearful children that you will be there to take care of them. Children should not be expected to be brave or tough, or to “not cry.”
  • Include children in recovery activities. Give children chores that are their responsibility. This will help children feel they are part of the recovery. Having a tasks help children feel empowered and give them a way to feel in control and useful. 
  • Go back as soon as possible to former routines. Maintain a regular schedule for children.
  • Let them have some control, such as choosing what outfit to wear or what meal to have for dinner.
  • Allow special privileges such as leaving the light on when they sleep for a period of time after the disaster.
  • Find ways to emphasize to the children that you love them.

Turn off the TV

Once you arrive at a shelter, hotel, or a relative’s home, disaster related TV programs should be restricted. News coverage of disasters​—especially if children see their own town or school on TV–can be traumatic to children of all ages. If children watch TV coverage of the disaster, parents should watch with them and talk about it afterwards.

Activities to Get Children Talking about a Disaster

Encourage children to draw or paint pictures of how they feel about their experiences. Write a story together of the event. You might start with: Once upon a time there was a terrible ______ and it scared us all ______. This is what happened: ______.
End the story with how things are getting better. 

​How to Get Your Family Ready Before a Disaster

It’s important for all family members to know how to react in an emergency, because when a disaster strikes, you may need to act quickly. Discuss possible disaster plans with your children–in a very general way–so that they will know what to do in various situations. For example, if you live in a part of the country that is prone to tornadoes, it is important for your children to know what to do if a tornado is coming. Remember that it is possible that you and your children may be in different places when a disaster strikes; for example at school and work. Also, older children may be home alone when faced with an emergency.

Create a Family Disaster Plan

You can create a Family Disaster Plan by taking some simple steps. It’s important for all family members to know how to react in an emergency because the best protection is knowing what to do. 

  • Talk with your children about the dangers of disasters that are likely in your area and how to prepare for each type.
  • Make sure they know where to go in your home to stay safe during an earthquake, tornado, hurricane, or other disasters likely for your area.
  • Teach your child how to recognize danger signals. Make sure your child knows what smoke detectors, fire alarms and local  community warning systems (horns, sirens) sound like and what to do when they hear them.
  • Explain to children how and when to call for help. Keep emergency phone numbers (your local Emergency Phone Number List) where family members can find them.
  • Pick an out-of-state family contact person who family members can “check-in” with if you are separated during an emergency. For children who are old enough help them to memorize the person’s name and phone number, or give them a copy of the emergency list included in the kit.
  • Agree on a meeting place away from your home (a neighbor or relative’s house or even a street corner) where you would get together if you were separated in an emergency. Give each family member an emergency list with the name, address and phone number of the meeting place. For children who are old enough help them to memorize the person’s name, address and phone number.
  • Put together a disaster supplies kit for your family.
  • Practice your Family Disaster Plan every six months so that everyone will remember what to do when in an emergency.

It's important for all family members to know how to react in an emergency because the best protection is knowing what to do.

Kids Get Ready Kit

Assemble a special "Get Ready Kit: for kids. Explain to your children that you might need to leave your house during a disaster and sleep somewhere else for a while. 

Here are some items you can your children could put into a backpack or container so it will be ready if needed: 

  • A few favorite books, crayons, and paper.
  • Favorite small toys like dolls or action figures. 
  • A board game.
  • A desk of cards.
  • A puzzle.
  • A favorite stuffed animal.
  • A favorite blanket or pillow.
  • A picture of your family and pets.
  • A box with special treasures that will help you feel safe.  

Pets

Most shelters can’t take pets, so plan what to do in case you have to evacuate. Call your local Humane Society to ask if there is an animal shelter in your area. Prepare a list of kennels and veterinarians who could shelter them in an emergency. Keep a list of “pet friendly” motels outside your area.

Disaster Supplies

Every family should have disaster supplies in their home. Needed supplies include food, water and other things that you might need in an emergency. In a hurricane, earthquake, or flood​, you could be without electricity for a week or more, or the water supply may be polluted. There also may be times, such as during a flood or a heavy winter storm, that you might not be able to leave your house for a few days. Your family may never need to use your disaster supplies, but it’s always best to be prepared. To make getting these items fun, you could have a family “Scavenger Hunt” and have family members see how many of these items they can find in your home.

Additional Information: 

 All information provided by Healthychildren.org.  For additional information and links, please go to http://www.healthychildren.org/English/safety-prevention/at-home/Pages/Getting-Your-Family-Prepared-for-a-Disaster.aspx

Last Updated

9/4/2014

Source

Adapted from Family Readiness Kit: Preparing to Handle Disasters, 2nd Edition

The information contained on this Web site should not be used as a substitute for the medical care and advice of your pediatrician. There may be variations in treatment that your pediatrician may recommend based on individual facts and circumstances.

 


Feed Families, Not Landfills
09-22-2014

Each year, Americans across the country are making difficult choices. Many people are forced to choose between buying food or buying medicine; parents are forced to go hungry so their children don't, and working families are forced to choose between paying their utilities or putting food on the table.

According to the U.S. Department of Agriculture, around 14 percent of American households do not get enough food to live active, healthy lifestyles. What makes this sad fact even harder to digest is this- a significant portion of the food tossed into our nations' landfills is wholesome, edible food. By redirecting that unspoiled food from the landfill to our neighbors in need, an organization can support its local community; reduce its environmental impact, and save money.

What Kind of Food Can Be Donated?

Non-perishable and unspoiled perishable food can be donated to local food banks, soup kitchens, pantries, and shelters. Typical food bank donors include large manufacturers, supermarket chains, wholesalers, farmers, food brokers, and organized community food drives. Perishable and prepared foods are typically collected from restaurants, caterers, corporate dining rooms, hotels, and other food establishments for prompt distribution to hungry people in their communities. Donated food includes leftovers from events and surplus food inventory.

Check with your local food bank or food rescue operation (soup kitchen, shelter, etc.) to find out what items they will accept. Your local food bank will often pick up the donations free of charge, reducing warehouse storage and disposal costs.

Where Can I Donate Food?

Food pantries, food banks, and food rescue programs are available across the country to collect food and redistribute it to those in need. Local and national programs frequently offer free pick-up and/or reusable containers to donors

Food banks are community-based, professional organizations that collect food from a variety of sources and save the food in warehouses. The food bank then distributes the food to hungry families and individuals through a variety of emergency food assistance agencies, such as soup kitchens, youth or senior centers, shelters and pantries. Most food banks tend to collect less perishable foods such as canned goods because they can be stored for a longer time.

Food rescue programs take excess perishable and prepared food and distribute it to agencies and charities that serve hungry people such as soup kitchens, youth or senior centers, shelters and pantries. Many of these agencies visit the food bank each week to select fresh produce and packaged products for their meal programs or food pantries. Many also take direct donations from stores, restaurants, cafeterias, and individuals with surplus food to share.

Resources to Help You Find a Local Food Bank or Food Rescue Program in Your Area:

  • Feeding America - A national network of food banks that is the largest charitable hunger relief organization in America. It oversees the distribution of surplus food and grocery products through nearly 200 network affiliate food banks and nearly 50,000 charitable agencies. Locate a food bank near you.
  • Food Pantries  - Allows you to search for food banks by state or by zip code.
  • AmpleHarvest.org - This nationwide effort aims to educate, encourage and enable gardeners with extra produce to easily donate to a local food pantry.
  • Rock and Wrap It Up! - An independent anti-poverty organization devoted to developing innovative greening solutions to the pressing issues of hunger and poverty in America. They cover over 500 cities and work with a national database of over 43,000 shelters and places of need.

Information provided by HealthyChildren.org.  For additional information and links, please go to  http://www.healthychildren.org/English/family-life/Community/Pages/Feed-Families-Not-Landfills.aspx

Last Updated 7/10/2014

 

Source

U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (http://www.epa.gov/foodrecovery/fd-donate.htm)

The information contained on this Web site should not be used as a substitute for the medical care and advice of your pediatrician. There may be variations in treatment that your pediatrician may recommend based on individual facts and circumstances

 


Reports of a Severe Respiratory Illness on the Rise
09-15-2014

Parts of the U.S. are experiencing an outbreak of respiratory illness that has sent hundreds of children to the hospital, including in Missouri, Kansas, Iowa, Illinois, Colorado, Ohio and Georgia. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has tested a number of these cases and found they were a type of enterovirus, a common virus that usually causes mild respiratory illness but that can become severe in some individuals. 

The CDC has updated information about this outbreak, including treatment recommendations and prevention advice at www.cdc.gov/non-polio-enterovirus/about/EV-D68.html

Enteroviruses cause about 10 to 15 million infections in the United States each year. Enteroviruses typically increase in the fall, though the 2014 outbreak appears to be associated with more severe disease, and with a virus that has not in the past been reported to cause widespread illness.

Who is at risk?

Anyone can become infected with enteroviruses. Many people infected will have no symptoms or only mild symptoms, like the common cold. According to the CDC, infants, children and teenagers, who do not yet have immunity from previous exposures to the virus, are more lik​ely to have serious illness. Infants and people with weakened immune systems have a greater chance of having complications.

This particular type of enterovirus – EV-D68 – is less common, but not new. It was first isolated in 1962 and has been rarely reported since then. Lab testing has confirmed cases of EV-D68 in children in Kansas City and in Chicago this year. The CDC is working with local and state health departments to monitor and track other possible clusters of this virus.

How is enterovirus treated?

Most people infected with an enterovirus will need supportive care for their symptoms. Any child or individual experiencing more severe symptoms, such as any difficulty breathing, should be examined by a health care provider. For children experiencing asthma-like symptoms, traditional asthma interventions should be used, but physicians have noted a slower response to bronchodilator therapy.

Important information for children with asthma:

Children who have previously been diagnosed with asthma should follow their asthma action plans and communicate with their health care provider regarding yellow and red zone instructions. More than half of the children with lab-confirmed EV-D68 in 2014 have a history of asthma or wheezing, according to the CDC. It's important for children with asthma to have their asthma be well-treated and controlled. 

Although no children should be exposed to secondhand smoke​, it’s important to prohibit smoking in homes where children with asthma live.

How are enteroviruses spread?

Enteroviruses are spread by close contact with an infected person. You can also become infected by touching objects or surfaces that have the virus on them and then touching your mouth, nose, or eyes.

How to reduce the risk of infection with enteroviruses:

To reduce the risk of infection with enteroviruses, recommendations include:

  • Wash hands often with soap and water for 20 seconds, especially after changing diapers
  • Avoid touching, eyes, nose, and mouth with unwashed hands
  • Avoid kissing, hugging, and sharing cups or eating utensils with people who are sick
  • Disinfect frequently touched surfaces, such as toys and doorknobs, especially if someone is sick
  • Stay home when feeling sick, and consult with your health care provider ​

Remember, enterovirus is different from the flu!  

To minimize confusion with influenza, and to protect against the flu virus, the American Academy of Pediatrics recommends all children ages six months and older be vaccinated against influenza at the earliest possible time.

Additional Information:

All information provided by HealthyChildren.org.  For more information and links, please go to  http://www.healthychildren.org/English/health-issues/conditions/infections/Pages/Reports-of-a-Severe-Respiratory-Illness-on-the-Rise.aspx

Last Updated

9/12/2014

Source

American Academy of Pediatrics (Copyright © 2014)

The information contained on this Web site should not be used as a substitute for the medical care and advice of your pediatrician. There may be variations in treatment that your pediatrician may recommend based on individual facts and circumstances.

 


How to Get Your Child to Eat More Fruits and Veggies
09-08-2014


We all know that eating fruits and vegetables is important. But how do you get kids to eat more of these foods? The following tips might help.

What You Can Do

  • Use fruits and vegetables as snacks.
  • Serve salads more often. Teach your child what an appropriate amount of salad dressing is and how it can be ordered on the side at restaurants.
  • Try out child-friendly vegetarian recipes for spaghetti, lasagna, chili, or other foods using vegetables instead of meat.
  • Include one green leafy or yellow vegetable for vitamin A such as spinach, broccoli, winter squash, greens, or carrots.
  • Include one vitamin C–rich fruit, vegetable, or juice, such as citrus juices, orange, grapefruit, strawberries, melon, tomato, and broccoli.
  • Include a fruit or vegetable as part of every meal or snack. For example, you could put fruit on cereal, add a piece of fruit or small salad to your child’s lunch, use vegetables and dip for an after-school snack, or add a vegetable or two you want to try to the family’s dinner.
  • Be a role model—eat more fruits and vegetables yourself.

How Much is Enough?

Be sure your child is getting the recommended amount of fruits and vegetables each day.

What You Can Do

  • Visit MyPlate to find out how much of each food group your child should be getting.
  • When shopping for food, start in the area of the store where they keep fresh fruits and vegetables. Stock up. That way you know you always have some on hand to serve your child.
  • Avoid buying high-calorie foods such as chips, cookies, and candy bars. Your child may not ask for these treats if they are not in sight.
  • Limit or eliminate how much fruit juice you give your child and make sure it is 100% juice, not juice “drinks.”
  • Eat as a family whenever possible. Research shows that kids eat more vegetables and fruits and less fried foods and sugary drinks when they eat with the entire family.

Remember

By choosing health-promoting foods, you can establish good nutritional habits in your child that will last for the rest of his or her life.

 Information provided by Healthychildren.org.  For additional information and links, please go to http://www.healthychildren.org/English/healthy-living/nutrition/Pages/How-to-Get-Your-Child-to-Eat-More-Fruits-and-Veggies.aspx

For audio, please click the link below.

http://app.na.readspeaker.com/cgi-bin/rsent?customerid=6511&lang=en_us&voice=Kate&readid=read_content&url=http://www.healthychildren.org/English/healthy-living/nutrition/Pages/How-to-Get-Your-Child-to-Eat-More-Fruits-and-Veggies.aspx

 

Last Updated

7/9/2014

Source

Pediatric Obesity: Prevention, Intervention, and Treatment Strategies for Primary Care (Copyright © 2014 American Academy of Pediatrics)

The information contained on this Web site should not be used as a substitute for the medical care and advice of your pediatrician. There may be variations in treatment that your pediatrician may recommend based on individual facts and circumstances.

 

 


Getting Your Family Prepared for a Disaster
09-04-2014

Article Body

What to Tell Your Children About Disasters

It is important to warn children, without overly alarming them, about disasters. Tell children that a disaster is something that could hurt people or cause damage. Explain that nature sometimes provides “too much of a good thing” – fire, rain, or wind. Talk about things that could happen during a storm, like the fact that the lights or phone might not work. Tell children there are many people who can help them during a disaster, so that they will not be afraid of firemen, policemen, paramedics, or other emergency officials.  Teach children:

  • How to call for help
  • How to shut off utilities (gas, electricity, etc.)
  • When to use emergency numbers; and
  • To call the family contact if they are separated.

Staying Calm in an Emergency

The most important role a parent can play in an emergency situation is to stay calm. Children of all ages can easily pick up on their parents’ fears and anxieties. In a disaster, they’ll look to you for help and for clues on how to act. If you react with alarm, a child may become more scared. If you seem overcome with a sense of loss, a child may feel their losses more strongly. However, experts agree that you should be honest with your children and explain what’s going on. Just be sure to base the amount of information and level of detail on what’s appropriate for their age level.

Children and Their Response to Disaster

Children depend on daily routines: They wake up, eat breakfast, go to school, and play with friends. When emergencies or disasters interrupt this routine, children may become anxious. Not want parents out of their sight/refuse to go to school or daycare. Feel guilty that they caused the disaster by something they said or did. Children’s fears also may stem from their imagination, and you should take these feelings seriously. A child who feels afraid is afraid. Your words and actions can provide reassurance. When talking with your child, be sure to present a realistic picture that is both honest and manageable. Be aware that after a disaster, children are most afraid that:

  • The event will happen again.
  • Someone will be injured or killed
  • They will be separated from the family
  • They will be left alone

Common Child Behaviors After a Disaster

Children may be upset over the loss of a favorite toy, blanket, teddy bear or other items that adults might consider insignificant. Undergo a personality change–from being quiet, obedient andcaring to loud, noisy and aggressive or from outgoing to shy and afraid. Have nightmares or be afraid to sleep alone or with the light off. Become easily upset, cry or whine. Lose trust in adults because the adults in their life were unable to control the disaster. Revert to younger behavior such as bedwetting and thumb sucking.

Special Needs of Children after a Disaster

Parents should remember that the psychological effects of a natural disaster don’t go away once the emergency has passed. Children can suffer from nightmares or other problems for up to two years after a disaster. Children are able to cope better with a traumatic event if parents, teachers and other adults support and help them with their experiences.

Help should start as soon as possible after the event. Some children may never show distress because they don’t feel upset, while others may not give evidence of being upset for several weeks or even months. Even if children do not show a change in behavior, they may still need your help. Parents should be on the lookout for signs that their kids need some extra counseling.

What Parents Can Do to Help Children Cope after a Disaster

Talk with children about how they are feeling and listen without judgment. Let them know they can have their own feelings, which might be different than others. Let children take their time to figure things out and to have their feelings. Don’t rush them or pretend that they don’t think or feel as they do. Here are some suggested ways to reduce your child’s fear and anxiety:

  • Keep the family together as much as possible. While you look for housing and assistance, try to keep the family together and make children a part of what you are doing. Otherwise, children could get anxious and worry that their parents won’t return.
  • Calmly and firmly explain the situation. As best as you can, tell children what you know about the disaster. Explain what will happen next. For example, say, “Tonight, we will all stay together in the shelter.” Get down to the child’s eye level and talk to them.
  • Encourage children to talk. Let them talk about the disaster and ask questions as much as they want. Encourage children to describe what they’re feeling. Help them learn to use words that express their feelings, such as happy, sad, angry, mad and scared. Just be sure the words fit their feelings–not yours.
  • Listen to what they say. If possible, include the entire family in the discussion. Reassure them that the disaster was not their fault in any way. Assure fearful children that you will be there to take care of them. Children should not be expected to be brave or tough, or to “not cry.”
  • Include children in recovery activities. Give children chores that are their responsibility. This will help children feel they are part of the recovery. Having a task will help them understand that everything will be all right.
  • Go back as soon as possible to former routines. Maintain a regular schedule for children.
  • Let them have some control, such as choosing what outfit to wear or what meal to have for dinner.
  • Allow special privileges such as leaving the light on when they sleep for a period of time after the disaster.
  • Find ways to emphasize to the children that you love them.

Turn off the TV

Once you arrive at a shelter, hotel, or a relative’s home, disaster related TV programs should be restricted. News coverage of disasters—especially if children see their own town or school on TV–can be traumatic to children of all ages. If children watch TV coverage of the disaster, parents should watch with them and talk about it afterwards.

Activities to Get Children Talking About a Disaster

Encourage children to draw or paint pictures of how they feel about their experiences. Hang these at the child’s eye level to be seen easily. Write a story of the frightening event. You might start with: Once upon a time there was a terrible ______ and it scared us all ______. This is what happened: ______.
Be sure to end with “And we are now safe.”

Kids Get Ready Kit

Assemble a Special “Get Ready Kit” for kids. Explain to your children that you might need to leave your house during a disaster and sleep somewhere else for awhile. Here are some items you and your children could put into a back pack so it will be ready if needed:

  • A few favorite books, crayons, and paper.
  • Two favorite small toys like a doll or action figure.
  • A board game.
  • A deck of cards.
  • A puzzle.
  • A favorite stuffed animal.
  • A favorite blanket or pillow.
  • Picture of your family and pets.
  • A box with special treasures that will help you feel safe.

How to Get Your Family Ready

It’s important for all family members to know how to react in an emergency, because when a disaster strikes, the best protection is knowing what to do. You should also discuss possible disaster plans with your children–in a very general way–so that they will know what to do in various situations. For example, if you live in a part of the country that is prone to tornadoes, it is important for your children to know what to do if a tornado is coming. Remember that it is possible that you and your children may be in different places when a disaster strikes; for example at school and work. Also, older children may be home alone when faced with an emergency.

Create a Family Disaster Plan

You can create a Family Disaster Plan by taking four simple steps. It’s important for all family members to know how to react in an emergency because the best protection is knowing what to do. Talk with your children about the dangers of disasters that are likely in your area and how to prepare for each type.

Make sure they know where to go in your home to stay safe during an earthquake, tornado, hurricane, or other disasters likely for your area.

Teach your child how to recognize danger signals. Make sure your child knows what smoke detectors, fire alarms and local  community warning systems (horns, sirens) sound like and what to do when they hear them.

Explain to children how and when to call for help. Keep emergency phone numbers (your local Emergency Phone Number List) where family members can find them.

Pick an out-of-state family contact person who family members can “check-in” with if you are separated during an emergency. For children who are old enough help them to memorize the person’s name and phone number, or give them a copy of the emergency list included in the kit.

Agree on a meeting place away from your home (a neighbor or relative’s house or even a street corner) where you would get together if you were separated in an emergency. Give each family member an emergency list with the name, address and phone number of the meeting place. For children who are old enough help them to memorize the person’s name, address and phone number.

Put together a disaster supplies kit for your family.

Practice your Family Disaster Plan every six months so that everyone will remember what to do when in an emergency.

It's important for all family members to know how to react in an emergency because the best protection is knowing what to do.

Pets

Shelters can’t take pets, so plan what to do in case you have to evacuate. Call your humane society to ask if there is an animal shelter in your area. Prepare a list of kennels and veterinarians who could shelter them in an emergency. Keep a list of “pet
friendly” motels outside your area.

Disaster Supplies

Every family should have disaster supplies in their home. Needed supplies include food, water and other things that you might need in an emergency. In a hurricane, earthquake, or flood, you could be without electricity for a week or more, or the water supply may be polluted. There also may be times, like during a flood or a heavy winter storm, that you might not be able to leave your house for a few days. Your family may never need to use your disaster supplies, but it’s always best to be prepared. To make getting these items fun, you could have a family “Scavenger Hunt” and have family members see how many of these items they can find in your home.

 All information provided by HealthyChildren.org.  For more information and links, please go to http://www.healthychildren.org/English/safety-prevention/at-home/Pages/Getting-Your-Family-Prepared-for-a-Disaster.aspx

Last Updated

8/7/2013

Source

Family Readiness Kit: Preparing to Handle Disasters, 2nd Edition

The information contained on this Web site should not be used as a substitute for the medical care and advice of your pediatrician. There may be variations in treatment that your pediatrician may recommend based on individual facts and circumstances.

 


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