Top Shadow

Tips of the Week for January, 2017

Winter Safety Tips
01-30-2017

​Whether winter brings severe storms, light dustings or just cold temperatures, the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) has some valuable tips on how to keep your children safe and warm.

What to Wear

  • Dress infants and children warmly for outdoor activities.  Several thin layers will keep them dry and warm. Don’t forget warm boots, gloves or mittens, and a hat. Choose boots that are large enough to comfortably accommodate two pairs of socks.
  • Remove drawstrings from clothing which may get caught on tree branches or play equipment. Replace with velcro.
  • The rule of thumb for older babies and young children is to dress them in one more layer of clothing than an adult would wear in the same conditions.
  • ​​When riding in the car, babies and children should wear thin, snug layers rather than thick, bulky coats or snowsuits. See Winter Car Seat Safety Tips from the AAP for help keeping your little ones warm and safe in the car. 
  • Blankets, quilts, pillows, bumpers, sheepskins and other loose bedding should be kept out of an infant's sleeping enviroment because they are associated with suffocation deaths and may contribute to Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS). It is better to use sleep clothing like one-piece sleepers or wearable blankets is preferred.
  • If a blanket must be used to keep a sleeping infant warm, it should be thin and tucked under the crib mattress, reaching only as far as the baby’s chest, so the infant's face is less likely to become covered by bedding materials.

Hypothermia

  • Hypothermia develops when a child's temperature falls below normal due to exposure to colder temperatures. It often happens when a youngster is playing outdoors in extremely cold weather without wearing proper clothing or when clothes get wet. It can occur more quickly in children than in adults.
  • As hypothermia sets in, the child may shiver and become lethargic and clumsy.  Speech may become slurred and body temperature will decline in more severe cases.
  • If you suspect your child is hypothermic, call 911 at once. Until help arrives, take the child indoors, remove any wet clothing, and wrap him in blankets or warm clothes.

Frostbite

  • Frostbite happens when the skin and outer tissues become frozen.  This condition tends to happen on extremities like the fingers, toes, ears and nose. Skin first becomes red and tingly, then gray and painful and finally white, cold and hard without pain. Blistering occurs after the skin thaws. 
  • Playing in temperatures or wind chills below -15° Fahrenheit  should be avoided becaused exposed skin begins to freeze within minutes.
  • Prevent frostbite by dressing in layers, covering all body parts when outside in cold weather. Bring children indoors if clothing gets wet.
  • If frostbite occurs, bring the child indoors and place the frostbitten parts of her body in warm (not hot) water. 104° Fahrenheit (about the temperature of most hot tubs) is recommended. Warm washcloths may be applied to frostbitten nose, ears and lips.
  • Administer acetaminophen or ibuprofen when you begin rewarming because as the skin thaws pain occurs.
  • Do not rub the frozen areas.
  • After a few minutes, dry and cover the child with clothing or blankets. Give him/her something warm to drink and seek medical attention immediately particularly if blistering occurs.

Winter Health

  • If your child suffers from winter nosebleeds, try using a cold air humidifier in the child's room at night. Saline nose drops or petrolatum jelly may help keep nasal tissues moist. If bleeding is severe or recurrent, consult your pediatrician.
  • Many pediatricians feel that bathing two or three times a week is enough for an infant’s first year. More frequent baths may dry out the skin, especially during the winter.
  • Cold weather does not cause colds or flu. But the viruses that cause colds and flu tend to be more common in the winter, when children are in school and are in closer contact with each other. Frequent hand washing and teaching your child to sneeze or cough into the bend of her elbow may help reduce the spread of colds and flu.
  • Children 6 months of age and up should get the influenza vaccine to reduce their risk of catching the flu. It's not too late to get the vaccine! Around 80% of all influenza illness generally occurs in January, February, and March. 

Winter Sports and Activities

  • Set reasonable limits on outdoor play to prevent hypothermia and frostbite and make sure kids have a place to go warm up when they get cold.  When weather is severe, have children come inside periodically to warm up.
  • ​Alcohol or drug use should not be permitted in any situation. They can be even more dangerous in winter activities like snowmobiling or skiing.

Ice Skating

  • Allow children to skate only on approved surfaces. Check for signs posted by local police or recreation departments, or call your local police department to find out which areas have been approved.
  • Advise your child to:
    • Skate in the same direction as the crowd
    • Avoid darting across the ice
    • Never skate alone
    • Not chew gum or eat candy while skating.
    • Consider having your child wear a helmet, knee pads and elbow pads, especially while learning to skate.

Sledding

  • Keep sledders away from motor vehicles.
  • Childr​en should be supervised while sledding.
  • Children less than 5 years of age should not sled alone. 
  • Keep young children separated from older children.
  • Sledding feet first or sitting up, instead of lying down head-first, may prevent head injuries.
  • Consider having your child wear a (hockey not bicycle) helmet while sledding.
  • Sleds should be structurally sound and free of sharp edges and splinters, and the steering mechanism should be well lubricated.
  • Sled slopes should be free of obstructions like trees or fences, be covered in snow not ice, not be too steep (slope of less than 30º), and end with a flat runoff.
  • Avoid sledding in crowded areas.

Snow Skiing and Snowboarding

  • Children should be taught to ski or snowboard by a qualified instructor in a program designed for children.
  • Never ski or snowboard alone.
  • Young children should always be supervised by an adult.  Older children’s need for adult supervision depends on their maturity and skill.  If older children are not with an adult, they should always at least be accompanied by a friend.
  • All skiers and snowboarders should wear helm​ets. Ski facilities should require helmet use, but if they do not, parents should enforce the requirement for their children.
  • Equipment should fit the child. Skiers should wear safety bindings that are adjusted at least every year. Snowboarders should wear gloves with built-in wrist guards. Hip pads have been shown to be effective in preventing fractures, as well. Eye protection or goggles should also be used.
  • Slopes should fit the ability and experience of the skier or snowboarder. Avoid crowded slopes.
  • Avoid skiing in areas with trees and other obstacles.

Snowmobiling

  • The AAP recommends that children under age 16 not operate snowmobiles and that children under age 6 never ride on snowmobiles.
  • Do not use a snowmobile to pull a sled or skiers.
  • Wear goggles and a safety helmet approved for use on motorized vehicles like motorcycles.
  • Travel at safe speeds.
  • Never snowmobile alone or at night.
  • Stay on marked trails, away from roads, water, railroads and pedestrians.

Sun Protection

  • The sun’s rays can still cause sunburn in the winter, especially when they reflect off snow. Make sure to cover your child’s exposed skin with sunscreen and consider using sunglasses.

Fire Protection

Winter is a time when household fires occur. It is a good time to remember to:

  • Buy and install smoke alarms on every floor of your home
  • Test smoke alarms monthly
  • Practice fire drills with your children
  • Install a carbon monoxide detector outside bedrooms
  • Keep space heaters at least 3 feet away from anything that could burn, and turn them off when leaving the room or sleeping.

​ ​​

Published

1/19/2016 12:00 AM

 

All information provided by HealthyChildren.org.  For additional information, please go to https://www.healthychildren.org/English/news/Pages/Winter-Safety.aspx

 

 

Simple Steps to Prevent Infections During Pregnancy
01-09-2017

​​​Infections during pregnancy can hurt both the mother-to-be and her baby. Making healthy choices and taking a few extra precautions can improve the chances that babies will be born healthy. 

Here are 11 things you can do during pregnancy to protect yourself and your baby from infections.

  1. Maintain good hygiene and wash your hands often—especially when around or caring for children. Regular handwashing, particularly before and after certain activities, is one of the best ways to remove germs, avoid getting sick, and prevent infections. If soap and running water are not available, you can use alcohol-based hand gel. Learn how clean hands save lives.
  2. Cook your meat until it's well done. The juices should run clear and there should be no pink inside. Do not eat hot dogs, luncheon meats, or deli meats, unless they are reheated until steaming hot. These undercooked meats and processed meats might contain harmful bacteria. Learn more about Listeria.
  3. Avoid unpasteurized (raw) milk and foods made from it. Do not eat soft cheeses such as feta, brie, and queso fresco unless they have labels that say they are pasteurized. Unpasteurized products can contain harmful bacteria. Learn more about raw milk dangers.
  4. Ask your doctor about Group B streptococcus (GBS). About 1 in 4 women carry this type of bacteria, but do not feel sick. An easy swab test near the end of pregnancy will show if you have this type of bacteria. If you do have GBS, talk to your doctor about how to protect your baby during labor. Learn more about GBS infections.
  5. Talk to your doctor about vaccinations. Some are recommended before you become pregnant, during pregnancy, or right after delivery. Having the right vaccinations at the right time can help keep you healthy and help keep your baby from getting very sick or having life-long health problems. Learn more about vaccinations during pregnancy and why the flu and Tdap vaccines are essential for pregnant moms.
  6. Get tested for sexually transmitted infections (STIs), such as HIV and hepatitis B, and protect yourself from them. Some people that have HIV, hepatitis B, or an STD do not feel sick. Knowing if you have one of these diseases is important. If you do, talk to your doctor about how you can reduce the chance that your baby will become sick. Learn more about preventing STIs.
  7. Avoid people who have an infection. Stay away from people who you know have infections, such as chickenpox or rubella, if you have not yet had it yourself or did not have the vaccine before pregnancy. Learn more about the MMR vaccine and the chickenpox vaccine.
  8. Protect against insects known to carry diseases. Stay abreast of developments in Zika virus in your area or places you might be traveling to. When mosquitoes and ticks are active, wear long-sleeved shirts and long pants when outside. Use Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) registered insect repellents with one of the following active ingredients: DEET, picaridin, IR3535, or oil of lemon eucalyptus (para-menthane-3,8-diol). Avoid travel to areas where infections can threaten you and your baby. Learn more about the Zika virus and pregnancy.
  9. Do not touch or change dirty cat litter and avoid contact with potentially contaminated soil. Have someone else do it. If you must change the litter yourself, be sure to wear gloves and wash your hands afterwards. Dirty cat litter and soil​ might contain a harmful parasite. Learn more about cats and toxoplasmosis.
  10. Stay away from wild or pet rodents, lizards and turtles, and their droppings. Have a pest control professional get rid of pests in or around your home. If you have a pet rodent, like a hamster or guinea pig, have someone else care for it until after your baby arrives. Some rodents might carry a harmful virus. Learn more about lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV).
  11. Only take vitamins in the doses recommended by your doctor. Your doctor may recommend a daily prenatal vitamin pill, which includes folic acid, iron, calcium and other minerals, and the fatty acids docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) and arachidonic acid (ARA). Make sure your doctor knows about any other supplements you may be taking, including herbal remedies. Learn more about the benefits of folic acid. ​

Additional Information & Resources:

 

Editor's Note: The article is published in recognition of National Birth Defects Prevention Month which occurs in January each year. Every 4½ minutes, a baby is born with a birth defect in the United States. Not all birth defects can be prevented. But, women can increase their chances of having a healthy baby by preventing infections before and during pregnancy. To join the conversation on Twitter, use the hashtag #Prevent2Protect or visit www.NBDPN.org

Last Updated

12/15/2016

Source

American Academy of Pediatrics (Copyright © 2016)

The information contained on this Web site should not be used as a substitute for the medical care and advice of your pediatrician. There may be variations in treatment that your pediatrician may recommend based on individual facts and circumstances.

 

All information provided by HealthyChildren.org.  For additional information, please go to the following website.

Simple Steps to Prevent Infections During Pregnancy
01-03-2017

​​​Infections during pregnancy can hurt both the mother-to-be and her baby. Making healthy choices and taking a few extra precautions can improve the chances that babies will be born healthy. 

Here are 11 things you can do during pregnancy to protect your baby from infections.

  1. Maintain good hygiene and wash your hands often—especially when around or caring for children. Regular handwashing, particularly before and after certain activities, is one of the best ways to remove germs, avoid getting sick, and prevent infections. If soap and running water are not available, you can use alcohol-based hand gel. Learn how clean hands save lives.
  2. Cook your meat until it's well done. The juices should run clear and there should be no pink inside. Do not eat hot dogs, luncheon meats, or deli meats, unless they are reheated until steaming hot. These undercooked meats and processed meats might contain harmful bacteria. Learn more about Listeria.
  3. Avoid unpasteurized (raw) milk and foods made from it. Do not eat soft cheeses such as feta, brie, and queso fresco unless they have labels that say they are pasteurized. Unpasteurized products can contain harmful bacteria. Learn more about raw milk dangers.
  4. Ask your doctor about Group B streptococcus (GBS). About 1 in 4 women carry this type of bacteria, but do not feel sick. An easy swab test near the end of pregnancy will show if you have this type of bacteria. If you do have GBS, talk to your doctor about how to protect your baby during labor. Learn more about GBS infections.
  5. Talk to your doctor about vaccinations. Some are recommended before you become pregnant, during pregnancy, or right after delivery. Having the right vaccinations at the right time can help keep you healthy and help keep your baby from getting very sick or having life-long health problems. Learn more about vaccinations during pregnancy and why the flu vaccine is essential for pregnant moms.
  6. Get tested for sexually transmitted infections (STIs), such as HIV and hepatitis B, and protect yourself from them. Some people that have HIV, hepatitis B, or an STD do not feel sick. Knowing if you have one of these diseases is important. If you do, talk to your doctor about how you can reduce the chance that your baby will become sick. Learn more about preventing STIs.
  7. Avoid people who have an infection. Stay away from people who you know have infections, such as chickenpox or rubella, if you have not yet had it yourself or did not have the vaccine before pregnancy. Learn more about the MMR vaccine and the chickenpox vaccine.
  8. Protect against insects known to carry diseases. Stay abreast of developments in congenital Zika virus. When mosquitoes and ticks are active, wear long-sleeved shirts and long pants when outside. Use Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) registered insect repellents with one of the following active ingredients: DEET, picaridin, IR3535, or oil of lemon eucalyptus (para-menthane-3,8-diol). Avoid travel to areas where infections can threaten you and your baby. Learn more about the Zika virus and pregnancy.
  9. Do not touch or change dirty cat litter. Have someone else do it. If you must change the litter yourself, be sure to wear gloves and wash your hands afterwards. Dirty cat litter might contain a harmful parasite. Learn more about cats and toxoplasmosis.
  10. Stay away from wild or pet rodents, lizards and turtles, and their droppings. Have a pest control professional get rid of pests in or around your home. If you have a pet rodent, like a hamster or guinea pig, have someone else care for it until after your baby arrives. Some rodents might carry a harmful virus. Learn more about lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV).
  11. Only take vitamins in the doses recommended by your doctor. Your doctor may recommend a daily prenatal vitamin pill, which includes folic acid, iron, calcium and other minerals, and the fatty acids docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) and arachidonic acid (ARA). Make sure your doctor knows about any other supplements you may be taking, including herbal remedies. Learn more about the benefits of folic acid. ​

Additional Information & Resources:

 

Editor's Note: The article is published in recognition of National Birth Defects Prevention Month which occurs in January each year. Every 4½ minutes, a baby is born with a birth defect in the United States. Not all birth defects can be prevented. But, women can increase their chances of having a healthy baby by preventing infections before and during pregnancy. To join the conversation on Twitter, use the hashtag #Prevent2Protect or visit www.NBDPN.org

Last Updated

12/15/2016

Source

American Academy of Pediatrics (Copyright © 2016)

The information contained on this Web site should not be used as a substitute for the medical care and advice of your pediatrician. There may be variations in treatment that your pediatrician may recommend based on individual facts and circumstances.

 

All information provided by HealthyChildren.org.  For additional information please go to https://www.healthychildren.org/English/ages-stages/prenatal/Pages/Simple-Steps-to-Prevent-Infections-During-Pregnancy.aspx

 

Bottom Shadow
Copyright 2010 by Goldsboro Pediatrics. All rights reserved.
Web Design by Evolve, Inc.
Bottom Shadow