Top Shadow

Tips of the Week for January, 2014

Raw Milk Dangers: What Parents Need to Know
01-27-2014

Raw milk is milk that comes straight from a cow, sheep, or goat. Raw milk is not pasteurized (heated to kill germs) or homogenized (processed to keep the cream from separating from the milk).​

Is Raw Milk Safe to Drink?

Raw milk is not safe to drink, because it can carry harmful bacteria and other germs. Harmful bacteria include Salmonella, E coli, and Listeria.

Anyone can get sick from drinking raw milk or products made from raw milk.

Products made with raw milk may include:

  • Cream
  • Cheeses
  • Yogurt
  • Ice cream
  • Frozen yogurt
  • Pudding

Children, pregnant women, people with weakened immune systems, or older adults are at greater risk of getting sick.

Symptoms of Illness:

  • Diarrhea
  • Stomach cramps
  • Vomiting
  • Flu-like symptoms, such as fever, headache, and body ache

While most healthy people get well, the symptoms can become chronic (long term) or severe or may result in death.

Call the Doctor If...

  • Anyone in your family becomes sick after drinking raw milk or eating products made from raw milk.
  • Anyone in your family is pregnant and drinks raw milk or eats products made from raw milk. The bacteria Listeria can cause miscarriage, fetal death, or illness or death of a newborn.

Food Safety Tips

The following are food safety tips from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC):

  • Only drink pasteurized milk.
  • Only eat milk products made from pasteurized milk. If "pasteurized" is not on the label or listed in the ingredients, ask to be sure.
  • Keep pasteurized dairy products in a refrigerator that is set at 40 degrees Fahrenheit or below.
  • Do not eat any expired dairy products. Be sure to throw out expired dairy products.

Facts About Pasteurization

The following are facts from the Food and Drug Administration (FDA):

  • Pasteurizing milk does not cause lactose intolerance and allergic reactions.
  • Pasteurizing milk does not reduce its nutritional value.
  • Pasteurizing milk does kill harmful bacteria.
  • Pasteurizing milk does save lives.

Additional Information

 Information provided by HealthyChildren.org.  For additional information, please go to the following link - http://www.healthychildren.org/English/healthy-living/nutrition/Pages/Raw-Milk-Dangers-What-Parents-Need-to-Know.aspx

Last Updated

11/21/2013

Source

Raw Milk: What You Need to Know (Copyright © 2013 American Academy of Pediatrics)

The information contained on this Web site should not be used as a substitute for the medical care and advice of your pediatrician. There may be variations in treatment that your pediatrician may recommend based on individual facts and circumstances.

 


Reduce the Risk of Birth Defects
01-22-2014

There are things you can do to ensure the healthiest possible pregnancy and reduce the risk of birth defects.

Preconception Health Care

Schedule a preconception visit with your doctor (or other clinician). Preconception health care is care that a woman of childbearing age receives before pregnancy. Interconception care is care between pregnancies.

Identifying Pre-existing Health Conditions

A preconception visit can help you and your doctor to identify and treat health conditions that may adversely affect your pregnancy. These conditions include:

Important Discussions

The visit gives your clinician the opportunity to discuss important subjects, such as:

Preconception visits are also an opportunity for your clinician to administer any missing vaccines and to make adjustments to any medications you are taking to ensure that they are the safest possible.

Family Health History

In addition to asking about your health history, your clinician will also ask about your partner’s and family’s health. If you or your partner have a history of birth defects or preterm births or if either of you has a high risk for a genetic disorder on the basis of family history, ethnic background, or age, your clinician may suggest that you see a genetic counselor.

Folic Acid

Your clinician will suggest that you take 0.4 mg of folic acid daily to prevent certain types of birth defects. A higher dose of folic acid may be recommended in some situations, especially if you have already had a child with a certain kind of birth defect or if you are taking certain medications.

 For additional information, please visit HealthyChildren.org - http://www.healthychildren.org/English/ages-stages/prenatal/Pages/Reduce-the-Risk-of-Birth-Defects.aspx

Last Updated

1/2/2014

Source

Pediatric Environmental Health, 3rd Edition (Copyright © American Academy of Pediatrics 2011)

The information contained on this Web site should not be used as a substitute for the medical care and advice of your pediatrician. There may be variations in treatment that your pediatrician may recommend based on individual facts and circumstances.

 


Reduce the Risk of Birth Defects
01-13-2014

There are things you can do to ensure the healthiest possible pregnancy and reduce the risk of birth defects.

Preconception Health Care

Schedule a preconception visit with your doctor (or other clinician). Preconception health care is care that a woman of childbearing age receives before pregnancy. Interconception care is care between pregnancies.

Identifying Pre-existing Health Conditions

A preconception visit can help you and your doctor to identify and treat health conditions that may adversely affect your pregnancy. These conditions include:

Important Discussions

The visit gives your clinician the opportunity to discuss important subjects, such as:

Preconception visits are also an opportunity for your clinician to administer any missing vaccines and to make adjustments to any medications you are taking to ensure that they are the safest possible.

Family Health History

In addition to asking about your health history, your clinician will also ask about your partner’s and family’s health. If you or your partner have a history of birth defects or preterm births or if either of you has a high risk for a genetic disorder on the basis of family history, ethnic background, or age, your clinician may suggest that you see a genetic counselor.

Folic Acid

Your clinician will suggest that you take 0.4 mg of folic acid daily to prevent certain types of birth defects. A higher dose of folic acid may be recommended in some situations, especially if you have already had a child with a certain kind of birth defect or if you are taking certain medications.

Information provided by/additional information may be found at HealthyChildren.org - http://www.healthychildren.org/English/ages-stages/prenatal/Pages/Reduce-the-Risk-of-Birth-Defects.aspx

Last Updated  1/2/2014

 

Source

Pediatric Environmental Health, 3rd Edition (Copyright © American Academy of Pediatrics 2011)

The information contained on this Web site should not be used as a substitute for the medical care and advice of your pediatrician. There may be variations in treatment that your pediatrician may recommend based on individual facts and circumstances

 


Chillin' With Winter Safety
01-06-2014

It may be cold outside, but it’s just as important for children to get physical activity during the winter as it is during the warmer months. Physical activity should be a healthy part of your family’s routine throughout the year. And safety should always be a central part of your children’s recreational fun.

Fun in the Winter Sun

It’s true that many safety concerns are the same regardless of season. For example, parents still need to remember sunscreen. Even though it might seem odd, you can get sunburn in the winter. The sunlight reflects off snow and ice.

  • Choose a sunscreen made for children with a sun protection factor (SPF) of at least 15. (Check the label.) Apply the protection 15 to 30 minutes before going out. They need to be reapplied every one and a half to two hours, particularly if your child spends a lot of time outside. Consult the instructions on the bottle. 
  • You should also wear protective eyewear and an SPF lip balm.  

Safety in Layers

When thinking about outside activity, think about clothing, too. Layering is a good idea; so are moisture-wicking fabrics and clothing that’s geared to the sport. Keep in mind that regulating body temperature is more difficult in younger children (just as it is during warm weather), so hypothermia can occur more easily. For example, kids can sweat when they’re warm and, as they remove layers, that sweat can chill them quickly when it gets exposed to the cold air. 

Parents have to be really proactive and responsible about dressing children appropriately in layers, covering their heads and necks.

Watch out for fashion trends that could land you in the ER:

  • Long scarves and cords can get caught in sled blades.
  • Hoods can block peripheral vision.

Stay Alert

Injuries can happen anywhere, anytime. Be aware and use caution.

  • Children should always wear helmets while sledding, skiing, snowboarding, and playing ice hockey. 
  • Parents should also make sure that the hill your children are sledding down doesn’t empty onto a pond that might not be frozen solid. 
  • Don’t load up the sled with multiple riders; take turns. "Reckless play," or actively trying to crash into each other or knock people off, is obviously a setup for injury.   

Equipment Check

If you’re planning a skiing or snowboarding trip:

  • Have the equipment fitted by a professional.
  • A child in too-large boots can trip and fall.
  • A child in skis that aren’t the right size can fall, too.
  • Wrist fractures, commonplace in snowboarding, can be prevented by simply using wrist guards.

Safety is key in ice hockey or sports involving equipment. No one wants to buy new skates every year, but it may be necessary as your child grows.

Used equipment is fine, but check it out before you buy it:

  • Look at the laces.
  • Look for broken blades.
  • Make sure the leather on hockey and ice skates isn’t too broken down around the ankles.
  • If you need a mouth guard, wear one.

You have to check all equipment, new and old, to see that it fits. You need to check it to make sure it’s still safe or not broken. If it gets used a lot, it may not hold up. Make sure helmets and boots are sized correctly. Make sure the equipment is in good shape. If you’re concerned, ask a sales person at a ski shop.     

Skills Assessment

If it’s a new activity, work with your child to master the skill first. For example, play it safe by starting with a snowboarding lesson before you all hit the slopes.

It’s recommended, appropriate and safe, to start slow or on a more gentle slope. Practice with your equipment and gradually build up to a steeper slope or faster speed. Be patient and resist pressure to take on more than you’re ready for.

By taking a few precautions, you can make sure that your children get the healthy benefits ts of winter exercise without taking unnecessary risks.

Additional Resources

 For additional information, please go to HealthyChildren.org or click on the following link - http://www.healthychildren.org/English/safety-prevention/at-play/Pages/Chillin-With-Winter-Safety.aspx

Last Updated

12/3/2013

Source

Adapted from Healthy Children Magazine, Winter 2008

The information contained on this Web site should not be used as a substitute for the medical care and advice of your pediatrician. There may be variations in treatment that your pediatrician may recommend based on individual facts and circumstances.

 


Bottom Shadow
Copyright 2010 by Goldsboro Pediatrics. All rights reserved.
Web Design by Evolve, Inc.
Bottom Shadow